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Over the river and through the wood— over the river and through the woods (not comparable) Used other than with a figurative or idiomatic meaning: see over,‎ the,‎ river,‎ and,‎ through,‎ the,‎ woods. The song version is sometimes presented with lines about Christmas, rather than Thanksgiving. to Grandfather's house away! as over the ground we go. trot fast, my dapple-gray!

album, which features “Over the River and Through the Wood,” associate director Ryan Murphy discussed his new arrangement of the song. Over the River and Through the Woods Thanksgiving Song. The poem was published in Child’s book of poems Flowers for Children, Volume 2, and was originally titled “The New-England Boy’s Song about Thanksgiving Day.” In time, Child’s poem was set to music by an unknown composer, and over the years many children have grown up singing the song in school or community holiday programs.

To Grandfather's house we go; over the river and through the woods (not comparable), Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Over the river and through the wood— Over the river and through the wood, to have a day of play! Over the river and through the wood, “Over the River and Through the Wood” was originally published in 1844 as a poem written by Lydia Maria Child. We seem to go extremely slow— for 'tis Thanksgiving Day. the horse knows the way to carry the sleigh

or if we get the sleigh upset Over the river, and through the wood— Over the river, and through the wood, Over the river and through the wood, with a clear blue winter sky.

Over the river and through the wood,

Old Jowler hears our bells.

Over the river, and through the wood— ",

Spring over the ground like a hunting-hound! (This conversation takes place starting at 11:29 in the video below.). He shakes his pow, with a loud bow-wow,[1] becomes "Hurrah for Christmas Day!". now Grandmother's cap I spy! Hurray for Thanskgiving Day!

Over the river, and through the wood, Hear the bells ring, "Ting-a-ling-ding! The Story Behind A Christmas Carol, Hallelujah!

It stings the toes and bites the nose, Traditionally “Over the River and Through the Wood” is sung as a Thanksgiving song, in which the original lyrics say, “Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day!” rather than “Hurrah for Christmas Day!” Another lyrical change was that the original poem read “Grandfather’s house” rather than “Grandmother’s house.” The original poem also contained 12 verses. Featuring Laura Osnes and Martin Jarvis Available Now. Over the river, and through the wood, [5] It celebrates the author's childhood memories of visiting her grandfather's house (said to be the Paul Curtis House).

See the Wikipedia article for more information. Spring over the ground like a hunting-hound!

Preview and purchase the album Hallelujah! trot fast my dapple gray!

through the white and drifted snow.

and straight through the barnyard gate. now Grandmother's cap I spy! to see little John and Ann; We would not stop for doll or top, But this nursery rhyme can also the year round, not only for Thanksgiving. Is the pudding done?

Over the river and through the wood,

It stings the toes and bites the nose, As over the ground we go. The book, which features young adult heroine Caroline Darley, was written by author Brynna Williamson and was published by Stones in Clay Publishing[9] in 2020. The following verses appear in a "long version": Over the river, and through the wood,

into a bank of snow.

See the Wikipedia article for more information. Over the river, and through the wood, to see little John and Ann. "The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day", "Lydia Maria Child and the Development of Children's Literature", "Lydia Maria Child: Reformer, Speaker and Writer", "Timeline Middle Ages and Early Modern Period - Environmental History Resources: The Little Ice Age (ca. it is so hard to wait!

She will say, "O, dear, the children are here,

and thus the news he tells. Originally based on a Thanksgiving poem written by Lydia Maria Child, this phrase was eventually turned into one of the many various Christmas carols and then soon developed its own meaning in the English lexicon. she will say, "Oh, dear, the children are here, Although many people sing "to grandmother's house we go", the author's original words were "to grandfather's house we go". Over the river and thru the woods, Oh, how the wind does blow!
as we go jingling by.

A children's book, Over the River—A Turkey's Tale, recasts the poem as a humorous tale of a family of turkeys on their way to a vegetarian Thanksgiving; the book was written by Derek Anderson, and published by Simon & Schuster in 2005.[8].

1300–1870)", National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Over_the_River_and_Through_the_Wood&oldid=977762883, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 10 September 2020, at 20:42.

oh, how the wind does blow! Over the river and through the wood, The poem was originally published as "The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day" in Child's Flowers for Children. The dogs do bark, and children hark, Over The River And Through The Woods is a traditional, American folk song and nursery rhyme that is often used for Thanksgiving day. (idiomatic, figuratively) To lose one's mind. to have a first-rate play. as we go jingling by.

For 'tis Thanksgiving Day. It stings the toes and bites the nose

We will kiss them all, and play snow-ball This page was last edited on 1 October 2019, at 14:49. the horse knows the way to carry the sleigh

As a Christmas song, it has been recorded as "A Merry Christmas at Grandmother's".

when Grandmother sees us come, no matter for winds that blow; He explained, “We did what’s called “asymmetrical meter” in it, which makes it feel like it’s a little bit off-kilter. trot fast my dapple gray! Over the river, and through the wood, and thus the news he tells. Hurrah for the pumpkin pie! Although the modern Thanksgiving holiday is not always associated with snow (snow in late November occasionally occurs in the northern states and is rare at best elsewhere in the United States), New England in the early 19th century was enduring the Little Ice Age, a colder era with earlier winters.[7]. We will kiss them all, and play snowball bring pie for everyone.". For 'tis Thanksgiving Day. The dogs do bark and the children hark, Over the river, and through the wood,

Oh hear the bells ring, "Ting-a-ling," to have a first-rate play. Over the river and through the woods, To grandfather's* house we go; The horse knows the way to carry the sleigh, Thru the white and drifted snow, oh!

and straight through the barnyard gate, Over the river and through the wood, For this is Christmas Day. oh, how the wind does blow! to have a first-rate play. Over the river, and through the wood— Over the river and through the wood,

to Grandfather's house away! Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day! For instance, the line "Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day!" Hurrah for the fun! it is so hard to wait! with a clear blue winter sky, (idiomatic, figurative) To be lost.

In a behind the scenes video about the Choir’s new Hallelujah!

Or if we get the sleigh upset over the river and through the woods Rate this phrase: (0.00 / 0 votes) To be lost. We would not stop for doll or top, Used other than with a figurative or idiomatic meaning: https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=over_the_river_and_through_the_woods&oldid=54527917, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. through the white and drifted snow. to Grandfather's house we go; and stay as long as we can. "The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day", also known as "Over the River and Through the Wood", is a Thanksgiving poem by Lydia Maria Child, originally published in 1844 in Flowers for Children, Volume 2. Over the river and through the wood— Over the river and through the wood, Hurrah for Christmas Day! The original piece had twelve stanzas, though only four are typically included in the song. Over the river and through the wood— through the white and drifted snow. Over the Years and Through the Woods is sold as two different packages—either a CD case or a DVD case. Over the river, and through the wood,

Over the Years and Through the Woods is the title of a live album and video by Queens of the Stone Age.The release features material on audio CD as well as video DVD—both recorded at London's Brixton Academy on Monday August 22, 2005 and KOKO on Tuesday August 23, 2005.

Lydia Maria Child was a novelist, journalist, teacher, and poet who wrote extensively about the need to eliminate slavery.

and stay as long as we can.

[6], The poem was eventually set to a tune by an unknown composer. "The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day",[1][2] also known as "Over the River and Through the Wood", is a Thanksgiving poem by Lydia Maria Child,[3] originally published in 1844 in Flowers for Children, Volume 2.[4]. for 'tis Thanksgiving Day.

to Grandmother's house we go;
as over the ground we go. When Grandmother sees us come,

the horse knows the way to carry the sleigh Is the pudding done? Over the river and through the wood, [4] Many people also mistakenly refer to the "Wood" in the song as plural "Woods" rather than singular. bring a pie for everyone." 8 Inspiring Folk Arrangements by Mack Wilberg, God Bless Us, Every One! “Over the River and Through the Wood” was originally published in 1844 as a poem written by Lydia Maria Child. Hurrah for the fun! Hurrah for the pumpkin pie! Hear the bells ring, "Ting-a-ling ding!". no matter for winds that blow; Over the river, and through the wood— (idiomatic, figurative) Trying to achieve a particular task, often with difficulty. Follow us for more insights on songs and performances by the Choir: © 2020 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. Origin of over-the-river-and-through-the-woods Originally based on a Thanksgiving poem written by Lydia Maria Child, this phrase was eventually turned into one of the many various Christmas carols and then soon developed its own meaning in the English lexicon.

Spring over the ground like a hunting-hound! Over the river and through the wood … It was a lot of fun to do the arrangement.”, Choir director Mack Wilberg added, “One of the reasons that I thought that this might make a good selection for this concert is that the piece that followed it, which is by Prokofiev, ‘The Troika,’ there’s sort of a similarity in riding a sleigh and going through the woods.” And then he corrected himself with a laugh, continuing, “Wood—I always thought it was ‘Over the River and Through the Woods.’ I think everybody did but, I remember when I saw Ryan’s arrangement I said, ‘You’ve left the ‘s’ off of woods and he said, ‘No, this is correct.’” “I wanted to be true to the original in that respect,” added Murphy. Over the River and Through the Wood is the first and only collection of its kind, offering readers an unequaled view of the quality and diversity of nineteenth-century American children's poetry.

into a bank of snow Music & the Spoken Word is Available in Many Languages, The Story Behind "Over the River and Through the Wood". Hear the bells ring, "Ting-a-ling ding!" he shakes his paw with a loud bow-wow, We seem to go extremely slow, The song from 1844 is actually often called "The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day".

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